Large Scale Networking (LSN)— Middleware and Grid Interagency Coordination (MAGIC) Team

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION  AGENCY: The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) National Coordination Office (NCO), National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of meetings. Contact: Dr. Grant Miller at miller@ nitrd.gov or (703) 292–4873. Reference the NITRD Web site at: http:// www.nitrd.gov/. Date/Location: The MAGIC Team meetings are held on the first Wednesday of each month, 2:00 p.m.– 4:00 p.m., at the National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22230. Please note that public seating for these meetings is limited and is available on a first-come, first-served basis. WebEx and/or Teleconference participation is available for each meeting. Please reference the MAGIC Team Web site for updates. MAGIC Web site: The agendas, minutes, and other meeting materials and information can be found on the MAGIC Web site at: https:// www.nitrd.gov/nitrdgroups/ index.php?title=Middleware_And_Grid_ Interagency_Coordination_(MAGIC).

SUMMARY: The MAGIC Team, established in 2002, provides a forum for information sharing among Federal agencies and non-Federal participants with interests and responsibility for middleware, Grid, and cloud projects. The MAGIC Team reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Interagency Working Group (IWG). Public Comments: The government seeks individual input; attendees/ participants may provide individual advice only. Members of the public are welcome to submit their comments to magic-comments@nitrd.gov. Please note that under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), all public comments and/or presentations will be treated as public documents and will be made available to the public via the MAGIC Team Web site.

Submitted by the National Science Foundation in support of the Networking and Information VerDate Sep<11>2014 18:04 Jun 15, 2016 Jkt 238001 PO 00000 Frm 00034 Fmt 4703 Sfmt 4703 E:\FR\FM\16JNN1.SGM 16JNN1 asabaliauskas on DSK3SPTVN1PROD with NOTICES Federal Register / Vol. 81, No. 116 / Thursday, June 16, 2016 / Notices 39281 Technology Research and Development (NITRD) National Coordination Office (NCO) on June 13, 2016. Suzanne H. Plimpton, Reports Clearance Officer, National Science Foundation.

Large Scale Networking (LSN)—Joint Engineering Team (JET)

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Large Scale Networking (LSN)—Joint Engineering Team (JET)

AGENCY: The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) National Coordination Office (NCO), National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of meetings. Contact: Dr. Grant Miller at miller@ nitrd.gov or (703) 292–4873. Reference the NITRD Web site at: http:// www.nitrd.gov/. Date/Location: The JET meetings are held on the third Tuesday of each month, 11:00 a.m.–2:00 p.m., at the National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22230. Please note that public seating for these meetings is limited and is available on a first-come, first-served basis. WebEx and/or Teleconference participation is available for each meeting. Please reference the JET Web site for updates. JET Web site: The agendas, minutes, and other meeting materials and information can be found on the JET Web site at: https://www.nitrd.gov/ nitrdgroups/index.php?title=Joint_ Engineering_Team_(JET).

SUMMARY: The JET, established in 1997, provides for information sharing among Federal agencies and non-Federal participants with interest in high performance research networking and networking to support science applications. The JET reports to the Large Scale Networking (LSN) Interagency Working Group (IWG). Public Comments: The government seeks individual input; attendees/ participants may provide individual advice only. Members of the public are welcome to submit their comments to jet-comments@nitrd.gov. Please note that under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), all public comments and/or presentations will be treated as public documents and will be made available to the public via the JET Web site.

Submitted by the National Science Foundation in support of the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) National Coordination Office (NCO) on June 13, 2016. Suzanne H. Plimpton, Reports Clearance Officer, National Science Foundation.

Faster Administration of Science and Technology Education and Research (FASTER) Community of Practice (CoP)

NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION

AGENCY: The Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) National Coordination Office (NCO), National Science Foundation.

ACTION: Notice of meetings. Contact: Mr. Fouad Ramia at ramia@ nitrd.gov or (703) 292–4873. Reference the NITRD Web site at: http:// www.nitrd.gov/. Date/Location: The FASTER CoP meetings will be held monthly (July 2016–June 2017) at the National Science Foundation, 4201 Wilson Boulevard, Arlington, VA 22230. Please note that public seating for these meetings is limited and is available on a first-come, first-served basis. WebEx and/or Teleconference participation is available for each meeting. Please reference the FASTER CoP Web site for meeting dates and times. FASTER Web site: The agendas, minutes, and other meeting materials and information can be found on the FASTER Web site at: https:// www.nitrd.gov/nitrdgroups/ index.php?title=FASTER.

SUMMARY: The goal of the FASTER CoP is to enhance collaboration and accelerate agencies’ adoption of advanced IT capabilities developed by Government-sponsored IT research. FASTER, seeks to accelerate deployment of promising research technologies; share protocol information, standards, and best practices; and coordinate and disseminate technology assessment and testbed results. Public Comments: The government seeks individual input; attendees/ participants may provide individual advice only. Members of the public are welcome to submit their comments to Faster-comments@nitrd.gov. Please note that under the provisions of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (FACA), all public comments and/or presentations will be treated as public documents and will be made available to the public via the FASTER CoP Web site.

Submitted by the National Science Foundation in support of the Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) National Coordination Office (NCO) on June 13, 2016. Suzanne H. Plimpton, Reports Clearance Officer, National Science Foundation.

Third Offset?

If you don’t know the term ‘third offset’ which refers to a technology change in defense materials it may be worthwhile reviewing this short  NDIA article and accompanying report by Govini. Can you track how your research signature area or interdisciplinary lab might fit in?

third offset

 

Smart People Live Here

smart people

A bit about Cooperative Ecosystem Studies Units Network

This article provides a easy-to-read primer about the CESU. Missouri S&T is eligible to work under two CESU (a) Great Plains and (b) Gulf Region.

Federal Research and Development Funding: FY2017

The Congressional Research Service has posted its analysis of R&D investment for the next federal fiscal year. You can check out that report here.

Key excerpts that caught my eye are: (underlined are topics where we have had some effort on campus to participate over the last three years)

  • Funding for R&D is concentrated in a few departments and agencies. Under President Obama’s
    FY2017 budget request, seven federal agencies would receive 95.6% of total federal R&D
    funding, with the Department of Defense (47.8%) and the Department of Health and Human
    Services (21.5%) accounting for nearly 70% of all federal R&D funding.
  • In dollars, the largest increases in agency R&D funding in the President’s request would go to the
    Department of Energy (up $2.755 billion, 19.1%), the Department of Defense (up $1.953 billion,
    2.8%), and the Department of Health and Human Services (up $772 million, 2.4%).
  • The President’s FY2017 request continues support for a number of multiagency R&D initiatives:
    the National Nanotechnology Initiative, Networking and Information Technology Research and
    Development program, U.S. Global Change Research Program, Brain Research through
    Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies (BRAIN) initiative, Precision Medicine Initiative,
    Cancer Moonshot, Materials Genome Initiative, National Robotics Initiative, and National
    Network for Manufacturing Innovation.

NIH Grantwriting TIP #7

from Meg Bouvier Medical Writing

Do you obtain text from your biostatistician and just cut-and-paste it all into the Data Analysis section at the end of the Approach?

The answer for most of you is yes, but you shouldn’t.
When reviewers are reading the recruitment section at the beginning of the Approach, they typically do not have the power calculations in front of them. Why not make it easy for reviewers and put your sample size/power calculations together with the text about recruitment? Then they can easily assess calculations and recruitment strategy in the same place. Judging from the number of Summary Statements I see in which reviewers raise concerns about recruitment and retention, it couldn’t hurt to position your supporting calculations together with the text– seems logical, but most of you aren’t doing it.

NAE Grand Challenge Scholars Program

see National Academy of Engineering Site

The profession of engineering has been, true to its Latin root ingeniare, about invention. For the past one hundred years, about as long as most college of engineering programs have existed, the list of the most important engineering achievements is dominated by devices: planes and spacecraft, cars and agricultural machines, lasers and PET scanners, to name a few from the National Academy of Engineering GREATEST ACHIEVEMENTS report.

Almost a decade into the new century, another NAE committee addressed the new engineering grand challenges and came to a much deeper unfolding of invention: Their list includes making solar energy economical, preventing nuclear terror, advancing health informatics, clean water and reverse engineering the human brain. None of them are just devices. Nearly all address complex social issues that require innovative technology and a systems approach to solve but cannot be solved in a vacuum. They will also require engineers to shape public policy, transfer technical innovation to the market place, and to inform and be informed by social science and the humanities. These are challenges to “change the world,” and many of them are inherently global.

By a fortunate coincidence, engineering students of this generation have the “right stuff” to address them. Judging by the survey results of the recent NRC report Engineer of 2020, this generation of students is surely motivated by puzzle solving – but more importantly, by a desire to change the world.

The 14 Grand Challenges

Congrats to Dan Oerther

see eNEWS story

Daniel B. Oerther; Mathes Chair; Evvironmental Research Center; Civil, Architectural and Environmental EngineeringDan awarded the American Academy of Environmental Engineers and Scientists (AAEES) 2016 Superior Achievement Award.