Archives for June 9, 2016

Spotlight: Charles Blaschke and Philip Schloss

Here is a great story about two young alumni taking on a global challenge in energy. See eNEWS article.

Charles Blaschke

Charles Blaschke Managing Director Taka Solutions

Phil Schloss

Phil Schloss Business Development Taka Solutions

Congrats to Dan Oerther

see eNEWS story

Daniel B. Oerther; Mathes Chair; Evvironmental Research Center; Civil, Architectural and Environmental EngineeringDan awarded the American Academy of Environmental Engineers and Scientists (AAEES) 2016 Superior Achievement Award.

Volkswagen Foundation Europe and Global Challenges

see PIVOT notice  €500,000 EUR

Abstract
One of the major aims of the initiative is to stimulate strong collaboration b e- tween researchers based in Europe and other parts of the world. Therefore, the foundation is looking for research groups-ideallyinvolving not more than four different institutions- from different geographical regions (e.g. Europe and Africa, or Latin America). The majority of the project participants should be working outside European Union countries. The foundations recommend participation of at least one principal investigator from Germany, Sweden, or the UK.

The Europe and Global Challenges initiative is looking towards the future of Europe and the challenges Europe is exposed to in an increasingly globalized world. Developed as a joint funding initiative between three European foundations, it reaches out to issues that are systematically interrelated and can only be dealt with collectively via supranational action on an international level. It is in this sense that the initiative addresses global challenges not universal problems which might be shared globally, but can be dealt with by local actors and do not necessarily need a globally coordinated solution.

Current problems perceived as “global challenges” comprise a large spectrum of different issues and complex interrelations, from poverty, spread of infectious disease, global warming and water scarcity through to regional conflicts, migration and terrorism. In order to limit the possible number of themes, this call will accept proposals related to the following global challenges:
– Climate change
– Global health
– Terrorism/Radicalization
– Migration
– Social inequality .

The hope is to receive proposals that take innovative and interdisciplinary approaches to addressing these themes. While the disciplinary focus within the research groups should be on the social sciences, input from other disciplines is expected where this is necessary to the research topic or questions proposed.

One of the major aims of the initiative is to stimulate strong collaboration b e- tween researchers based in Europe and other parts of the world. Therefore, the foundation is looking for research groups-ideally involving not more than four different institutions- from different geographical regions (e.g. Europe and Africa, or Latin America). The majority of the project participants should be working outside European Union countries. The foundations recommend participation of at least one principal investigator from Germany, Sweden, or the UK.

Preference will be given to proposals with a strong inter – regional collaboration, which include contributions from various disciplines and which have the potential to break new ground. It is up to the applicants to show why and how their proposals are feasible and why this particular research formation is appropriate for the research questions at hand.

Toyota Foundation Research Grant Program – Exploring New Values for Society

see PIVOT notice   ¥1,000,000 JPY

Abstract
The Toyota Foundation is a grant-making foundation whose goal is to contribute toward the realization of a more people-oriented society and a resulting increase in human happiness. They provide grants in support ofresearch and operations in order to respond to a diverse array of social issues, with a focus on areas of human and natural environment, social welfare, and education and culture. From the outset, the Toyota Foundation has provided grants with an eye to supporting projects based on foresight, a participatory orientation, and an international perspective.

Program Objectives

The world in which we live today is undergoing dramatic changes amid social and economic development, the surge of globalization, and rapid advances in science and technology. While these changes have broadened horizons and enhanced affluence, at the same time they have generated a complex array of social problems. Living as we do in this era of historical change, we need to precisely determine the essence of these problems and search for solutions as we pave the way for the future.

The various issues that need to be addressed include those that are on a global scale and those that transcend generations, as well nascent problems that will only fully manifest themselves in the future. This means that it will be difficult to find clues and solutions that help to bring about a new society on the basis of existing values or compartmentalized expertise. Rather, in seeking to clarify what values we should pursue, it is necessary to fundamentally reevaluate our way of thinking and the state of society from a wider perspective that adopts a panoramic view of the world and looks decades into the future, while maintaining a firm grasp on the problems that are occurring right in front of our eyes. Taking into consideration the existing values, we need to stand outside them to build new viewpoints that can be shared with others. In this way, we can erect the singposts that will guide us to perspectives on a broader world and the future we have yet to perceive.

In this program, the Toyota Foundation provides grants to research projects that explore basic ideas and methodology on what approach we should take to address difficult issues to be faced in the future and on what society we should aim to reach and disseminate their findings so that they can be shared as new values for society. The program has established two grant categories respectively for joint research projects and individual research projects, both of which places no restriction on the areas of research or the methods employed. For both categories, the foundation solicits ambitious projects that are founded on creative concepts that reflect a youthful perspective and whose endeavors can help change people’s way of thinking regardless of their country or region of origin or their social position and circumstances.

 

Google Research Awards: Faculty Research Awards

see PIVOT notice   $150,000

Abstract
The Faculty Research Awards Program, sometimes referred to as the Research Awards Program, supports academic research in computer science, engineering, and related fields. Through the program, Google funds world-class research at top universities, facilitate interaction between Google and academia, and support projects whose output will be made openly available to the research community.

The intent of the Google Research Awards is to support cutting-edge research in Computer Science, Engineering, and related fields. We ask applicants to categorize their proposals into one of the following broad research areas of interest to Google. Please note that this topic list has been revised since the last round of the Faculty Research Awards. At this time, we are only considering proposals on the topics listed below:
– Computational neuroscience
– Geo/maps
– Human-computer interaction
– Information retrieval, extraction, and organization (including semantic graphs)
– Machine learning and data mining
– Machine perception
– Machine translation
– Mobile
– Natural language processing
– Networking
– Physical Interfaces and Immersive Experiences
– Privacy
– Security
– Software engineering and programming languages
– Speech
– Structured data and database management
– Systems (hardware and software)

Each funded project will be assigned a Google sponsor. The role of the sponsor is to support the project by discussing research directions, engaging with professors and students, and overseeing collaboration between the project team and Google. We encourage Research Awards recipients to visit Google to give talks related to their work and meet with relevant research groups here. Through the Research Awards program, we try to fund projects where collaboration with Google will be especially valuable to the research team.

NSF: Campus Cyberinfrastructure

see PIVOT notice    $16,000,000

Abstract
The Campus Cyberinfrastructure (CC*) program invests in coordinated campus-level cyberinfrastructure (CI) components of data, networking, and computing infrastructure, capabilities, and integrated services leading to higher levels of performance, reliability and predictability for science applications and distributed research projects. Learning and workforce development (LWD) in CI is explicitly addressed in the program. Science-driven requirements are the primary motivation for any proposed activity.

CC* awards will be supported in seven areas:
(1) Data Driven Multi-Campus/Multi-Institution Model Implementations
(2) Cyber Team
(3) Data Driven Networking Infrastructure for the Campus and Researcher
(4) Network Design and Implementation for Small Institutions
(5) Network Integration and Applied Innovation
(6) Campus Computing
(7) Innovative Integrated Storage Resources

NIH submissions tip: Do you love the look of block text that is justified to both the left and right margin?

from Meg Bouvier Medical Writing

Reviewers don’t.

As a grantwriting buddy of mine recently said, with left- and right-justify the block text looks terrific — from about 5 feet away. However, those of us who have to read a ton of these submissions find the odd spacing between words that results from this formatting strategy very fatiguing on the eyes. Please stick with left-margin justify. Every time I make this suggestion in an on-site training, someone in the audience nods emphatically in agreement, and invariably it turns out that the person is an NIH reviewer. File this tip under “don’t annoy your reviewers.”