Archives for September 15, 2015

Rock Mechanics and Explosives Research Center Gathering — any interested faculty are invited to attend

Our  second Graduate Gathering of the Fall 2015 Semester will be held on Friday, September 18, 2015 at 3:30 pm, in the RMERC Conference Room.

Our speaker this week is  Dr. David Summers, Emeritus Professor,   Former Director of the RMERC

Topic:   Dealing with Explosives at MS&T:  a History

Abstract

While Explosives form a very useful tool in a wide variety of applications, occasions arise when, because of age or inappropriate location, they must be disarmed and rendered inoperative.  Historically this has often meant that they were destroyed in place, or in safe locations.  Yet local destruction can cause collateral damage, and the constituents of modern explosives are often expensive, and alternate reprocessing of the materials can be beneficial.  For over twenty years faculty at MS&T worked on the use of high pressure waterjets as a way of solving this problem.  From initial tests that showed that high-pressure water could safely cut into and remove explosive, through tools to detect, uncover and inert landmines and IEDs campus faculty showed that these tools could be effective, and in developing robotic systems to wash out explosives from warheads, and then chemically reform the constituents into other products they showed a practical path to reclamation, with operational equipment delivered to the Navy for this purpose.  The various programs that allowed these developments will be reviewed in this presentation.

Thank You!

 

Kathy Morris

Administrative Assistant

Rock Mechanics & Explosives Research Center

Missouri University of Science and Technology

1006 Kingshighway, Rolla, MO 65409-0660

morriskat@mst.edu

ph:   573-341-6036

Honeywell signs master sponsored research agreement

Article published in Missouri S&T news. 

 

Honeywell (NNSA NATIONAL SECURITY CAMPUS) signed an agreement today to speed research collaborations with Missouri S&T. Honeywell has given a Renishaw 3D prototyping (printing) machine to the Advanced Manufacturing Best in Class team to assist in developing the utility and cost of 3D printing of metal parts.

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Broader Impacts Network Presentation

Interview with Bruce McMillin

Bruce McMillin, a seasoned researcher in his own right and a team co-lead in the signature area SMART LIVING, gave me an interview from his perspective as helping Dean Ian Ferguson with research matters in the College of Engineering and Computing.

K M Donnell’s work picked up by Physics.org

Kristen M. Donnell Electrical and Computer Engineering 216 Emerson Electric Company Hall Rolla, MO  65409-0040 Phone:  573-341-6229 kmdgfd@mst.edu

Kristen M. Donnell
Electrical and Computer Engineering
216 Emerson Electric Company Hall
Rolla, MO 65409-0040
Phone: 573-341-6229
kmdgfd@mst.edu

Physics.org published an article “Researcher uses microwave to ‘bake’ experiments” about the research done by Dr. Kristen Donnell. Check it out here.

Wafer Scale Infrared Detectors (WIRED)

Sponsor
United States Department of Defense (DOD)
Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA)
Microsystems Technology Office (MTO)
The objective of the WIRED program is to demonstrate infrared detectors and cameras that enable low-cost, large format, high performance SWIR, MWIR, and LWIR imaging. The program also seeks a better understanding of thefundamental properties, limitations, and benefits of wafer-scale detector technology and disordered materials. Successful proposals will identify and develop band-specific, non-traditional, infrared disordered materials that can provide imagers that overcome the limitations in Part II, Section 1.A. Of particular interest is the use of materials that can be directly deposited/integrated on ROICs with high performance and for a fraction of the cost, in comparison to current detectors. Proposals suggesting wafer-scaletransfer of traditional epitaxial device architectures (e.g. those based on HgCdTe, InSb, InGaAs, Type-II superlattices, Sb-based barrier detectors, etc.) are discouraged. Proposals that leverage traditional materials are of interest only if they exploit revolutionary and previously unexplored device principles and are compatible with direct fabrication on CMOS wafers. Proposals should describe a plan to understand the fundamental processes that define device behavior, with a goal of projecting the ultimate performance limits of the technology. The plan should include physics-based modeling to describe the complex charge transport behavior in disordered materials and understand how these properties impact device-level behavior.

WIRED is soliciting innovative proposals in three Technical Areas:
Technical Area 1: Design and develop photodetectors for an imager that will operate in the MWIR spectral band. Use appropriate materials and wafer-scaleprocessing techniques for FPAs with pixel pitch less than or equal to 10um. Demonstrate a prototype camera with operational characteristics given in Table 1, without the need for cryogenic cooling or hybrid bump bonding.
Technical Area 2: Design and develop photodetectors for an imager that will operate in the SWIR spectral band. Use appropriate materials and wafer-scaleprocessing techniques to produce FPAs with pixel pitch less than or equal to 3 um. Demonstrate a prototype camera with operational characteristics given in Table 2, without the need for cryogenic cooling or hybrid bump bonding.
Technical Area 3: Design and develop scalable photodetectors for an imager that will operate in the LWIR spectral band. Demonstrate that high quantum efficiency and <0.05 A/cm2 dark current can be achieved at room temperature. Use appropriate materials and wafer-scale processing techniques to produce FPAs with pixel pitch less than or equal to 12um and demonstrate a breadboard camera.